PISD holds mass victim training sessions for school nurses

PISD holds mass victim training sessions for school nurses
Posted on 02/16/2018
Nurses training session photo

Melillo Middle School nurse, Amee Stoneman, reads the information on a "victim" during the simulation
Melillo Middle School nurse, Amee Stoneman, reads information on a "victim" during a mass victim simulation.




By Jade Wise
Pasadena ISD Communications


The Pasadena ISD Administrative Services department recently held an all-day training seminar for school nurses at PISD, where they simulated mass victim situations. 

The special training was the result of months of planning by the district’s Chief Nursing Officer April Weisedel. However, the Valentine’s Day shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida really brought a somber and real tone to the group.

“The training session was very informative and made us really think about how we need to prioritize care, but it was also nerve-wracking, especially in light of recent events,” said Amee Stoneman, Melillo Middle School nurse.

During the training, the school nurses went through a series of sessions, where they encountered different scenarios with both mannequins and live participants. 

According to Weisedel, the training session wasn’t just about a potential school shooting incident.

“Our nurses have to be ready for anything, so this gives them the skills needed to handle multiple victims at a time and gives them the knowledge to go back to their campus and train the school staff.”

During a 25-minute triage trauma training simulation, a team of nurses had to respond to a group of ten student volunteers acting out a script while wearing artificial wounds and bloody clothing.

The simulation required the team leader to identify and tag each “victim” appropriately according to the universal, international system of prioritizing the severity of injuries.

The method helps nurses understand how to quickly decide what color the patient should be tagged in under 30 seconds.

A red tag means urgent - the individual needs medical attention and an ambulance right away.
A yellow tag means delayed - the injury is not life threatening if they have to wait about thirty minutes for an available ambulance.
Green tags mean the individual is classified as a walking wounded. He/she is injured but it is not life threatening and the individual can move under their own power.
A black tag means expectant or deceased - the individual cannot be saved at this point or is already gone.

The nurses were given a grade and evaluation of how they responded to the situation along with tips and instructions of how to be more efficient and better prepared.

Patrick Tran, a volunteer student from Dobie High said, “I think this type of training is very important for nurses to learn, just in case any crisis situation were to happen. If that type of situation were to ever happen, I feel better, knowing that the nurses will know exactly what to do.”


A high school volunteer has fake blood applied for the training
A high school volunteer has fake blood applied for the training.

A team of nurses work on a mannequin during a training exercise
A team of nurses work on a mannequin during a training exercise.

A nurse applies pressure on a fake neck wound during the training
A nurse applies pressure on a fake neck wound during the training.